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Often billed as the world’s ultimate wildlife spectacle, the Great Migration of wildebeest and zebra takes place annually across the plains of East Africa; Amanda Canning travels to Tanzania to try to catch up with the herds. 
A Toyota Land Cruiser with canvas roof and open sides drives along two tyre tracks in short savannah grasses; there is a large acacia tree to the truck's right, along with a distant herd of Thomson’s gazelles.
Amanda’s Land Cruiser bumps along the Namiri Plains in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
First day on safari: slow gnus day
It’s been an excellent night for the predators of the Serengeti. As the sun starts to inch over the horizon and casts a pale light over the acacia-pocked plains, it reveals a scene of nocturnal carnage. There are bones here, bones over there, bones everywhere. White bones picked clean and dazzling as if fashioned from porcelain; scrappy, dirty bones, bits of unidentifiable flesh still clinging to them; bones that retain the shape of the animal from whence they came.
Above it all, vultures wheel through the sky or sit hunched in acacias, occasionally floating down to earth to better inspect a kill, looking every bit as sinister as one might hope from their villainous, cartoon reputation. A good number of the night’s revelers are still out, enjoying the last bits of the feast before heading home for a day’s solid napping.
Two young hyenas emerge from their den; the one in the front looks to its left, while the smaller one behind stares at the camera.
Often depicted as serial scavengers, hyenas actually kill three-quarters of their meals © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
We’ve not long left our camp on the Namiri Plains before my guide Noel Akyoo spots a flurry of activity in the distance and bumps the Land Cruiser in its direction. A hyena trots past,
the back legs of a Thomson’s gazelle dangling from its jaws. Beyond him, a group of around 20 hyenas is gathered around the rapidly disintegrating carcass of a wildebeest, some plastered in blood up to their shoulders.
They break into a fight, squabbling over a prime piece of meat, before continuing to feed in a riot of chattering and whooping. A pair of jackals sits nearby in eager anticipation, not brave enough to move in, too hungry to move on. In a tree behind them, a tawny eagle pulls at a rib held in its yellow talons.
Introducing Tanzania
The Serengeti’s predators don’t always have it this good. I’ve timed my visit to coincide with the Great Migration, the annual 1,200-mile journey of 1.5 million wildebeest and 250,000 zebra between Tanzania and Kenya, following the rains and the grasses that spring up in their wake.
The season is bonanza time for any creature that counts them as dinner – for the lions, cheetahs, leopards, hyenas and wild dogs here, hunting at this time of year requires as much effort as picking a dish from the conveyor belt at Yo! Sushi. It must be, I assume, fairly easy for a human to track down the migrants too.
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Two superb starlings standing on a rock; they have black heads, white eyes, iridescent blue shoulders and wings, and reddish-brown bodies.
Superb starlings are just that, superb © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
I am wrong. There is plenty of evidence of deceased wildebeest, and small living clumps of them idling about or plodding to some unseen destination across the plains, but I expected to be overwhelmed by thousands upon thousands of the beasts, thundering past in clouds of dust.
Where you should go on your first safari in Africa
Noel moves the Land Cruiser off and we trundle along rutted tracks. “We will try and find them,” he says, “but the migration was early this year.
The herds are already moving south to give birth in the woodlands.” He laughs. “That is the beauty of the Serengeti – you never know what you’re going to come across.” What we do come across on that first day is extraordinary enough.
There are the wonders of animals not generally on people’s wildlife checklists: the bright flashes of superb starlings come to investigate what we are; a long-horned beetle slowly eating a yellow fever tree from the inside out; the pointy ears of a caracal hiding (badly) in the long grass. And there are the big-hitters too.
A lioness lays outstretched on a large granite boulder, with her head flopped back and underside of her jaw visible; lying on top of her lower rear legs is a little cub, with eyes wide open. A second, larger cub lays nearby.
A lioness rests with her cubs on a granite boulder, or “kopje”; she and other adults in the pride leave the cubs to hunt at night © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
The Namiri Plains is known for its cheetahs, at one point off-limits to visitors for over 20 years in an effort to increase their numbers. We spot several through the day, their long,
Thin bodies stretched out in the dust or pulled upright on termite mounds, alert to the hint of prey. There is an emarrassment of lions too, lolling about in the grass or cooling themselves on the rocks, tiny cubs tumbling about like furry drunks as the pride males consolidate their standing as the rock stars of the savannah, manes billowing in the wind and backlit by the setting sun.
A huge tree trunk dominates the image, rising from the ground and then forking off four directions; at the junction of huge branches rests a lion, with its tail hanging down toward the camera's view.
A young female leopard rests in the crook of a tree after hunting a gazelle © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
We have the rare privilege of spotting a leopard, too, an elegant female tucked into the crook of a tree, her long tail twitching against the trunk. 
Returning to camp, though, I can’t help but be nagged by the somewhat ungrateful thought that the trip represents the only chance in my lifetime to experience one of the world’s greatest wildlife spectacles, and it’s happening somewhere else. Noel is unconcerned. “Every day is different,” he says, clambering out of the vehicle. “There is always tomorrow.”
A balloon rises into the early morning sky above the Serengeti's savannah.
A hot-air balloon ride at sunrise is a stunning way to understand the lay of the land and to see wildlife from above © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
Second day on safari: hot-air balloon over the Serengeti
The day starts beneath a billion stars. I am standing outside my tent, watching as two shoot across the inky sky when the deep guttural rumble of a lion reverberates through the darkness. It is likely some way off, down by the river bordering the camp, but it is a sound of such primordial resonance, my entire body seems to vibrate to it.
With dawn approaching, the lion’s time to hunt is over: it’s my turn to take on a shift. The day has brought a change in tack: if we can’t find the migration from the ground, perhaps we’ll have better luck from the sky.
The story of lions (and your guide on where to see them on safari)
The last stars are fading as our hot-air balloon slides into the sky. For the first few minutes, we skim across the ground, past trotting warthogs and strutting ostrich, then suddenly we are a hundred meters up, with all of the Serengeti stretched out beneath us.
It is a vast beige sea, dotted with acacias and granite outcrops. The Seronera River wiggles through it, the shiny lumps of a hippo pod visible in its shallows.
A rising inferno of flame is seen within the inside of the hot-air balloon.
Up, up and away with Serengeti Balloon Safaris © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
Pulling on the burner, captain Mohamed Masud studies the ground beneath us. “You can see how busy this area gets in migration time,” he says.
“There are so many trails.” The earth looks scratched, there are countless pale lines cut into it, rift into the ground by millions of hooves passing this way for a million years. There is little sign of the herds this morning though. “We don’t really know where they are now,” continues Mohamed.
“The rain has not come so the migration is really spread out. Maybe if it rains, it will come.”
A day on safari in Africa: what you can expect in camp and in the wild
The grazing animals that live in this patch of the Serengeti year-round are out in force. Giraffes bob across the savannah, galloping for cover on gangly legs as we sail overhead, their unexpected arrival into woodland marked by the alarmed calls of ibis and morning doves.
As I peer after them, I spy several groups of animals standing unmoving among the trees: wildebeest. Not thousands, not thundering past in clouds of dust – but wildebeest all the same.
As viewed from above, wildebeest snaking through acacia trees on the savannah plains of the Serengeti.
Wildebeest on their way to the Seronera River; they are but a small part of a migrating herd numbering 1.5 million animals © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
Back on the ground, we head towards the woods and almost immediately catch up with our target. A long line of several hundred wildebeest is plodding towards the river.
They need to cross a road to join the huddles I’d seen from the balloon, but none seems willing to make the first move. “The thing about wildebeest,” says Noel, “is that they don’t have a leader. If the one in front changes direction, they all follow.” We watch as they make slow comedic progress towards their goal.
One animal bolts, and a hundred animals bolt. One stops, and they all stop. One starts heading back the way it came, and within minutes, the entire herd has spun around. It takes a good two hours of confused milling before they finally muster up the courage to cross.
As we lurch back to camp, triumphant after the first, small taste of the migration, I turn and take a last look at the herd: behind them, fat, dark clouds are starting to bubble on the horizon. The rains are coming.
One cheetah standing, another lying, in front of a twisted acacia tree; the cats blend in well and are hard to see.
Surveying the scene, a mother cheetah and her cub camouflaged against an acacia tree © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
Third day on safari: cheetahs hunting on the Serengeti plains
If the migration is heading south, then so must we. It’s a short bounce in a light aircraft to the next camp in the southern Serengeti. From the air, it’s clear we’re catching up with the wildebeest: far below, innumerable black dots are moving steadily in the same direction as we are.
From the airstrip, my guide Charles Joseph takes us straight off to a herd he’s been following for a few days. Many thousand wildebeest, the odd zebra mingled among them, are plowing across the plains, a huge billowing cloud of dust rising overhead. The line is so long we can’t see the front or end of it.
“This group has been moving back and forth for nearly a week,” says Charles. “They’re looking for water.”
We are not the only ones watching. All around them, predators lurk, waiting for night. There is one creature that needs not the cover of darkness to mount an attack. Across the plains, Charles spies a cheetah and her cub sheltering behind a whistling thorn acacia.
The mother is restless and apparently hungry. “Cheetahs are right down the pecking order of predators,” says Charles, as large globs of rain start to splatter into the dust around us. “They can’t compete with a lion or a wild dog, so their only advantage is to hunt in daytime.”
A cheetah chases a Thompson's gazelle through the savannah grasses.
Despite its speed, a cheetah still relies on surprise to make its kills © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
We spend the next few hours tracking the mother as she locks sight on her prey, readies to attack, and is then spotted and her plan thwarted. Soon the savannah is a vast soggy field, and the cheetah is perfectly camouflaged within it. Still, every gazelle seems wise to her approach.
She has traveled several miles before she gets her chance. Hunkering down in long grass, she waits for two gazelles to approach. They walk past her, oblivious, and she does not move. Just as I imagine she’s missed her chance, she is off and after them in an explosion of force.
Within 20 seconds, one gazelle is down. The mother and cub take it in turns to feed, one constantly watching out for scavengers. “You can’t relax for a second out here,” says Charles as three vultures land nearby. “The hyenas won’t be long. They’ll have seen the vultures circling and will follow.”
Their luck holds, however; the only creatures that come to join the party are dung beetles, which whirr in from all directions and have a marvelous time in the gazelle’s bowel. The cheetahs leave only the head and bladder intact. “The hyenas will have that,” says Charles.
“They don’t really care what they eat.” I’ve been so transfixed that it’s only when the pair drop full-bellied into the grass that I become aware of the life now brimming on the plains: there are thousands upon thousands of wildebeest, behind, in front, to the side, trudging ever on.
In the early morning light, a herd of wildebeest run across the savannah in the Serengeti.
A wildebeest herd running toward their winter grazing grounds in the southern Serengeti © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
Fourth day on safari: wild dogs and death on the Great Migration
Overnight, our camp has become a motorway for the migration. I could spend the day in bed and watch it pass meters away, but we decide to head further south, where they’ve had more rain, to try to catch the rest of the herds.
We drive for a few hours, crest the Maru Hills – and there before us is the Promised Land for grazing creatures. There is not an inch of the earth not occupied by one. Gnus and zebra stand grunting, resting in the shade of trees or splashing about in rivers. Baboons sit and pick at each other’s fur. Elephants roam, hosing their hides with water from their trunks. The grass is green and long, the fruit on the trees plentiful and ripe. If I were a wildebeest, I’d walk a thousand miles for this too.
A pack of wild dogs (or 'painted dogs') run toward a herd of wildebeast; the sun is low on the horizon and everything is painted in shades of red, gold and orange.
A pack of wild dogs on the hunt for a wildebeest © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
Returning home in the warm glow of the setting sun and the satisfaction of a mission accomplished, we’re drawn to a commotion close to camp. Thousands of wildebeest are stampeding, and we soon see why: wild dogs. A pack is herding the animals into groups, assessing which to target. It’s a world of confusion: dust flying, legs kicking, prey grunting, predators barking, and the rumble of hooves like a drum beat to it all.
And then the Serengeti pulls off the world’s greatest magic trick and makes the entire scene disappear. We sit in silence in the murk, the dust slowly settling around us. A bark comes in from the left, and off we go. When we rejoin the hunt, it’s apparent the pack has marked its prey: a juvenile is being forced out of the herd.
“They’re super hunters, one of the best predators in the world,” says Charles. “Once they have made a decision to hunt, they do not stop until they have their kill.”
The wildebeest is done for. A dog gets hold of its leg and pulls it down. The pack is upon it in a frenzy, wary that a lion might turn up and make off with the spoils. It takes an excruciatingly long time for the animal to die. It’s still alive and trying to get up as one dog runs off with its liver and another its intestines.
I return, queasily, to camp to find the wildebeest and zebra still passing through. It is a steadying sight, the timelessness of the endeavor brought into sharper focus after the macabre events of the last hour. Naturally, the animals are marching solemnly in the opposite direction they had been that morning. They may know where they’re going, but they’re not going to get there any time soon.
The hazy morning plains of the Serengeti; acacia trees stand almost silhouetted on the grassy plains.
A moment of solitude on the Serengeti © Jonathan Gregson / Lonely Planet
When to go on Great Migration safari in the Serengeti
The animals follow the same path each year, traipsing back and forth between the Serengeti in Tanzania and the Masai Mara in Kenya. The migration does not follow a strict schedule, however, and its precise location in any one month cannot be guaranteed. Factors such as an early or late rainy season will affect when the 1.5 million wildebeest and 250,000 zebra start to move. If you’re booking well ahead,
it’s wise to go with a tour operator or camp who is able to change your itinerary depending on the herds’ progress. The below is a rough guide only.
January to March: Grazing and calving in the southern Serengeti
April to May: Herds start to move north, passing through the central Serengeti
June to August: Cross the crocodile- and hippo-infested Mara River and head into the Masai Mara
September to October: Grazing in the Masai Mara
November to December: Return south, and the cycle begins again
Need to know
  • Check ahead with the US Embassy in Tanzania for the latest updates regarding COVID-19 testing and vaccine requirements. 
  • You’ll need an up-to-date yellow fever vaccination to enter Tanzania. Don’t forget to bring your certificate – you’ll need to show it at the airport on arrival.
  • You’ll want a course of anti-malarial drugs to cover your stay, and to bring mosquito repellent. If you don’t like DEET-based or other chemical repellents, we’ve found the natural, citronella versions effective (and considerably less stinky).
  • The plains can be dusty, particularly on windy days. Bring a light scarf or Buff to cover your face. You’ll want a jumper or jacket for cooler morning game drives.
  • Your guide will have a pair of binoculars they’ll likely let you borrow, but it’s worth bringing your own. A pair with 8x or 10x magnification will do the trick.
  • Don’t bring bright or patterned clothing that will make you stand out to all animals within a mile radius; plain grey, green or beige clothes are best.
Getting to the Serengeti
It’s a two-stop hop to the Serengeti; you’ll likely fly via Nairobi or Amsterdam on your way to Kilimanjaro International Airport in Tanzania; from there, catch a light aircraft to one of the region’s airstrips. Your lodge will advise which one is most convenient.
Introducing East Africa
Getting around the Serengeti
Light aircraft act as buses in the Serengeti, picking people up from one part of the park and depositing them elsewhere, likely with stops on the way for other passengers. Lodges will arrange to collect you from the airstrip
Amanda Canning traveled to Tanzania with support from Audley Travel. Lonely Planet contributors do not accept freebies in exchange for positive coverage.
You might also like: 
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Travelling to Africa with my young daughters: a father’s story
Why seeing chimpanzees is one of the world’s greatest wildlife experiences

Serengeti’s Great Migration: The World’s Ultimate Wildlife Spectacle / By Amanda Canning / www.lonelyplanet.com / Exclusive News / Janbolat Khanat Almaty Tourism & News Office

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    Exclusivelifestyle / Top 10 Sunglasses Brands In The World

    Exclusivelifestyle / Top 10 Sunglasses Brands In The World / www.globalbrandsmagazine.com / Sedat Karagöz / Janbolat Khanat Almaty Tourism ,Culture,Art News Office

    Sunglasses are an essential accessory for many people, not only for fashion but also for protecting the eyes from the sun’s harmful rays. With so many brands and models available on the market, choosing the right pair of sunglasses can be overwhelming. In this guide, we will introduce you to the top 10 sunglasses brands in the world, highlighting their unique features and designs.

    Ray-Ban:

    Free Sunglasses in Close Up Photography Stock Photo

    Ray-Ban is an American brand of sunglasses and eyeglasses founded in 1937. It is known for its iconic Aviator and Wayfarer styles. It is considered one of the world’s most popular and recognizable brands. Ray-Ban offers a wide range of sunglasses in different styles, materials, and colors, from classic models to more trendy designs. They also provide polarized and gradient lenses, perfect for outdoor activities.

    Oakley:

    Free stock photo of adult, african, afro Stock Photo

    Oakley is an American brand of sunglasses, sports equipment, and clothing. Founded in 1975, Oakley is known for its high-performance sunglasses and cutting-edge technology, such as polarized lenses, high-definition optics, and lightweight materials like O-Matter. Oakley’s designs are often geared toward athletes and sports enthusiasts. Still, they also have a wide range of stylish sunglasses for everyday wear.

    Gucci: 

    Free Black Framed Sunglasses on White Table Cloth Stock Photo

    Gucci is an Italian luxury brand that offers a wide range of sunglasses in various styles and designs. Gucci sunglasses are known for their high-quality materials and craftsmanship. They are considered a status symbol among fashion-conscious consumers. Gucci’s sunglasses range from classic and elegant to bold and colorful designs, often featuring the brand’s signature logo or patterns.

    Prada:

    Prada is an Italian luxury fashion house that produces different sunglasses in various styles and designs. Prada sunglasses are known for their high-quality materials and craftsmanship. They are considered a status symbol among fashion-conscious consumers. Prada’s sunglasses designs are often sleek and minimalistic, focusing on high-quality materials and craftsmanship.

    Versace:

    Special Project Aviator Sunglasses - A4 Sunglasses

    Versace is an Italian luxury fashion house that produces different sunglasses in various styles and designs. Versace sunglasses are known for their bold and colorful designs and are considered a status symbol among fashion-conscious consumers.

    Versace’s sunglasses often feature the brand’s iconic Medusa logo and are known for their bold and glamorous designs. They offer a wide range of sunglasses that cater to both men and women and are suitable for different occasions.

    Persol: 

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    Persol is an Italian brand of sunglasses and eyeglasses founded in 1917. It is known for its high-quality materials and craftsmanship. It is considered one of the most popular luxury brands in the world. Persol’s sunglasses are crafted with attention to detail and are designed to provide maximum comfort and protection. They offer a wide range of models, from classic designs to more modern and trendy styles.

    Dior:

    MissDior B1U Front view

    Dior is a French luxury fashion house that produces different sunglasses in various styles and designs. Dior sunglasses are known for their high-quality materials and craftsmanship. They are considered a status symbol among fashion-conscious consumers. Dior’s sunglasses range from classic and elegant designs to bold and colorful styles, focusing on high-quality materials and craftsmanship.

    Tom Ford: 

    Tom Ford is an American luxury fashion brand that produces different sunglasses in various styles and designs. Tom Ford sunglasses are known for their high-quality materials and craftsmanship. They are considered a status symbol among fashion-conscious consumers. Tom Ford’s sunglasses are designed with a focus on luxury and style, and they offer a wide range of models that cater to both men and women.

    Maui Jim:

    Maui Jim is an American sunglasses brand founded in 1980. It is known for its high-performance polarized lenses. It is considered one of the world’s most popular and recognizable brands. Maui Jim’s sunglasses are designed for outdoor enthusiasts. They offer a wide range of models that provide maximum protection and comfort, with polarized lenses that reduce glare and enhance color.

    Carrera:

    Carrera is an Austrian brand of sunglasses and eyeglasses founded in 1956. The company is known for its sporty and elegant designs, focusing on high-quality materials and craftsmanship. Carrera’s sunglasses are suitable for a wide range of sports and outdoor activities. They offer a wide range of models catering to men and women.

    It’s important to note that this list is not in any particular order and is based on market share, customer reviews, and popularity. Many other brands also produce quality sunglasses. It is always recommended to research, compare different models and features, and read customer reviews before making a purchase.

    When purchasing sunglasses, you must consider your personal needs and preferences. If you’re an athlete or outdoor enthusiast, look for sunglasses with polarized lenses and high-performance features. If you’re looking for sunglasses as a fashion accessory, look for brands known for stylish designs.

    Another essential factor to consider is the UV protection provided by sunglasses. Look for sunglasses that offer 100% UV protection to protect your eyes from the sun’s harmful rays.

    Additionally, it’s also recommended to choose a brand with a good reputation for customer service and warranty. This ensures that you’ll have a positive experience with the brand and that you can get help if you have any issues with your sunglasses.

    In conclusion, the top 10 sunglasses brands are Ray-Ban, Oakley, Gucci, Prada, Versace, Persol, Dior, Tom Ford, Maui Jim, Carrera, and many other brands that produce quality sunglasses. Always research and compare different models and features before making a purchase.

    Choosing Your Preferred Sunglasses – Definitive Guide

    When shopping for sunglasses, there are several important factors to consider to ensure you make the best purchase for your needs.

    Lens Material: 

    The lens material is an essential factor to consider when purchasing sunglasses. Some of the most common lens materials include glass, plastic, and polycarbonate. Glass lenses are the most durable and scratch-resistant but are also the heaviest. Plastic lenses are lightweight and affordable, but glass is less stable than Polycarbonate lenses are lightweight, durable, and shatter-resistant, making them ideal for sports and outdoor activities.

    Lens Color: 

    The color of the lens can also affect the level of protection and the type of activity for which the sunglasses are best suited. For example, grey or green lenses reduce glare and provide accurate color perception, making them ideal for driving or water sports. Brown or amber lenses enhance contrast and depth perception, making them perfect for golf or hiking.

    Frame Material:

     The frame material is another vital factor when purchasing sunglasses. The most common frame materials include plastic, metal, and titanium. Plastic frames are lightweight and affordable but less durable than metal or titanium frames. Metal frames are durable and can be adjusted for a better fit, but they can be heavy. Titanium frames are lightweight, durable, and hypoallergenic, making them ideal for sensitive skin.

    Frame Size and Shape: 

    The frame’s size and shape are also essential when purchasing sunglasses. The structure should fit comfortably and securely on your face. The shape of the frame should complement the shape of your face.

    UV Protection:

     Look for sunglasses that offer 100% UV protection to protect your eyes from the sun’s harmful rays. The level of UV protection is often indicated on the sunglasses’ label or packaging.

    Polarization:

    Polarized lenses are specially coated lenses that reduce glare and improve visibility, making them ideal for activities such as water sports, fishing, and driving. These lenses block intense reflected light, which can cause glare and make it difficult to see. Polarized lenses can be made from various materials, including glass, plastic, and polycarbonate. They are also available in multiple colors and tints to suit lighting conditions and activities.

    Brand Reputation: 

    Choosing a reputable brand with a good track record in customer service and warranty is essential. Check the warranty and service options of the brand you’re interested in before making a purchase. A good brand reputation indicates quality and reliability, so it’s worth considering when making your purchase.

    Price: 

    Compare the different models and brands you’re interested in. Look for sales or special deals that can help you save money. While price is an important consideration, it’s not the only factor to consider. The most expensive sunglasses may not always be the best option, so compare features and quality before making a purchase.

    Customer Reviews:

     Read customer reviews to get an idea of the pros and cons of different models and brands. Customer reviews can provide valuable insight into other sunglasses’ durability, comfort, and overall quality. They can also show you how well the sunglasses perform in different situations, such as in bright sunlight or while engaging in sports or other activities.

    Style:

     Consider the style of the sunglasses and how they will fit in with your fashion sense. Some sunglasses come in different colors and finishes, such as tortoise shells or mirrored lenses. Think about whether you prefer a classic or trendier look and whether the sunglasses will match your overall personal style. You can also choose from various frame shapes such as round, square, cat-eye, and many more.

    Additionally, it’s also essential to try on the sunglasses before purchasing to ensure they fit comfortably and securely on your face. Please confirm that the sunglasses are not too tight or loose and don’t press against your temples or ears.

    In conclusion, when buying sunglasses, it’s essential to consider the lens material, lens color, frame material, frame size, shape, UV protection, polarization, brand reputation, price, customer reviews, and style. Considering these factors, you can make an informed decision and choose a pair of sunglasses that will meet your specific needs and preferences. Remember to take your time and research different models, features, and prices before making a purchase.

    Exclusivelifestyle / Top 10 Sunglasses Brands In The World / www.globalbrandsmagazine.com / Sedat Karagöz / Janbolat Khanat Almaty Tourism ,Culture,Art News Office

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